Friday, January 15, 2021

3 Facts All Parents Should Know About ADHD Stimulant Drugs

Medicating children for a host of mental disorders has become very popular in some parts of the USA. More than 8 million kids from 6 months to 17 years of age are on pharmaceutical drugs in this wonderful country. We lead the world in drugging youth for behavioral, cognitive and attention issues. We are once again #1. But I would like to share with parents as well as adults working with children a few not so readily available facts related to medicating kids for behavior issues.

Reasons Not to Believe in Lithium

I Don’t Believe in God, But I Believe in Lithium’ is the title of Jamie Lowe’s moving account of her manic depression in the New York Times. The piece reminds us how devastating and frightening this condition can be, so it is understandable that the author put her faith in the miracle cure psychiatrists have been recommending since the 1950s: lithium. The main problem is that there is no study in which people who have been started on lithium have been compared with people who haven’t.

Benzodiazepines Linked to Treatment Resistant Depression

Prior use of benzodiazepines, such as Xanax, Librium, or Ativan, may increase the risk of treatment-resistant depression (TRD), according to a new study published in The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease.

Gradual Tapering is Most Successful for Withdrawal from Antipsychotics

Mixed-Methods study explores the experiences of antipsychotic discontinuation among service users.

Study of Online Antidepressant Forums Reveals Long Lasting Withdrawal Effects

Effects of discontinuing SSRIs and SNRIs reported on an online forum indicate significant and long-lasting withdrawal symptoms.

How Western Psychiatry Harms Alternative Understandings of Mental Health

An anthropological look at the Global Mental Health (GMH) movement suggests several ethical problems and contradictions in its mission.

New Study Casts Doubt on Efficacy of Ketamine for Depression

A new study, published this month in the Journal of Affective Disorders, investigated the effectiveness of weekly intravenous ketamine injections as a treatment for...

The Reckoning in Psychiatry Over Protracted Antidepressant Withdrawal

Medically-induced harm—affecting tens of millions of people worldwide—has taken the field decades to take seriously.

New Research Suggests Brain Abnormalities in ‘Schizophrenia’ May Result From Antipsychotics

Study finds that reduced cortical thickness and brain surface area associated with 'schizophrenia' may result from antipsychotic drug use.

The FDA Is Hiding Reports Linking Psych Drugs to Homicides

In my wildest dreams, I could never have imagined being drawn into a story of intrigue involving my own government’s efforts to hide, from the public, reports of psychiatric drugs associated with cases of murder, including homicides committed by youth on the drugs. But that is precisely the intrigue I now find myself enmeshed in.

Professionals Push Back on Psychiatric Diagnostic Manual, Propose Alternatives

Criticisms of the DSM-5 spark alternative proposals and calls to reform diagnostic systems in the mental health field.

Use of Antidepressants Linked to Diabetes

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (such as Prozac and Zoloft) are the most commonly prescribed medication for depression. SSRIs have long been associated with an...

Researchers: “Antidepressants Should Not be Used for Adults with Major Depressive Disorder”

A new review, published in BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, concludes that antidepressants should not be used as the risks outweigh evidence for benefits.

Long-term Usage of ADHD Drugs Linked to Growth Suppression

Findings suggest that treatment not only fails to reduce the severity of “ADHD” symptoms in adulthood but is associated with decreased height.

Tapering Strips Help People Discontinue Antidepressants

A new study by Peter Groot and Jim van Os has found that tapering strips help people successfully discontinue antidepressant medications.

A Tale of Two Studies

With increasing evidence that psychiatric drugs do more harm than good over the long term, the field of psychiatry often seems focused on sifting through the mounds of research data it has collected, eager to at last sit up and cry, here’s a shiny speck of gold! Our drugs do work! One recently published study on withdrawal of antipsychotics tells of long-term benefits. A second tells of long-term harm. Which one is convincing?

Very Slow Tapering Best For Antidepressant Withdrawal

A new article in Lancet Psychiatry finds that slower tapering of SSRIs is better for preventing antidepressant withdrawal effects.

Children with ‘ADHD’ Commonly Prescribed Antipsychotics

Despite little evidence for benefit, and substantial risk of harm, antipsychotics are commonly prescribed to children diagnosed with ADHD

No Matter Which Measure You Use, Antidepressants Aren’t That Effective

Researchers compared the efficacy of antidepressants using different rating scales and found them to be no different—just slightly better than placebo, and not meeting the criteria for clinical significance.
one yellow game piece among blue game pieces

Is There a Small Group for Whom Antidepressants Are Effective?

In a new study, researchers found no evidence of antidepressant group variance, which means that there's no particular group of patients who improve more than others on the drug.

Researchers Set the Record Straight on Controversial Zoloft Study

An issue of Lancet Psychiatry is devoted to clarifying the lack of efficacy for Zoloft (sertraline).

Researchers Expose Pharmaceutical Industry Misconduct and Corruption

Corruption of pharmaceutical industry sponsored clinical trials identified as a “major obstacle” facing evidence-based medicine.

Treating Metabolic Conditions May Resolve Some Depressive Symptoms

New research suggests that treatable metabolic abnormalities underlie some treatment-resistant cases of depression—and treating the metabolic condition has the possibility of dramatically reducing depressive symptoms

Withdrawal Symptoms Routinely Confound Findings of Psychiatric Drug Studies

Researchers examine how rapid discontinuation can mimic the relapse of mental health symptoms and confound psychiatric drug studies.

Researchers: Antidepressant Withdrawal, Not “Discontinuation Syndrome”

Researchers suggest that the pharmaceutical industry had a vested interest in using the term “discontinuation” in order to hide the severity of physical dependence and withdrawal reactions many people experience from antidepressants.

Follow Us

19,639FansLike
11,994FollowersFollow
4,730SubscribersSubscribe