Wednesday, February 8, 2023

Tag: ssri withdrawal

When Tapering Antidepressants, is Going Slow Always the Best Strategy?

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Do we take enough account of total drug exposure time when devising antidepressant tapering strategies?

Facebook Groups Provide Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal Help When Doctors Don’t

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A new study looks at how online communities provide information and support for patients experiencing psychiatric drug withdrawal.

Listening to the Patient Voice: The Antidepressant Withdrawal Experience

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Patient advocates join with researchers and service users to present first-hand experiences of antidepressant withdrawal.

Tapering Strips Help People Stop Using Antidepressants, Study Finds

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A new study by Peter Groot and Jim van Os investigated whether tapering strips can help people stop using antidepressants.

Fear and Belief in “Chemical Imbalance” Prevent People from Coming Off...

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Researchers interviewed people who were given medical advice to discontinue antidepressants.

Derek Blumke – The Mad in America Veterans Initiative

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On MIA Radio we interview Derek Blumke, who tells of his time serving in the military, his experiences taking and coming off psychiatric drugs and his role as editor of MIA's new Veterans Initiative.

Two Years Tapering an Antidepressant – A Life-Changing Experience That I...

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My heart goes out to anyone experiencing withdrawal, but especially those who are so ill they can’t work and are struggling to navigate a heartless and cynical ‘benefits’ system. Their only crime is to have experienced difficulty from a prescribed treatment, yet they are treated as medical pariahs.

Surviving Antidepressants – Antidepressant Withdrawal

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Volunteer-led peer-support for tapering off psychiatric drugs and for withdrawal syndrome and tips about coping with symptoms.

Systematic Review Finds Antidepressant Withdrawal Common and Potentially Long-lasting

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Prominent researchers conduct a review of antidepressant withdrawal incidence, duration, and severity. Results lead to call for new clinical guidelines.

Conflicts of Interest Questioned in Review of Prescribed Drug Dependence

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An interview with Professor Sami Timimi, Psychiatrist Peter Gordon and campaigner Stevie Lewis, who talk about the potential for conflicts of interest with the UK Royal College of Psychiatrists participation in a Government-led review of Prescribed Drug Dependence.

Thirty Mental Health Experts Write to Secretary of State About ‘Unprofessional’...

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0 mental health experts write to Secretary of State about 'unprofessional' conduct of the UK Royal College of Psychiatry

Over Half of Antidepressant Users Experience Withdrawal When They Stop Medication

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From STUFF: More than half of antidepressant users had withdrawal when stopping the medication and a third reported addiction issues, a study finds. Only one per...

Tapering Strips Help People Discontinue Antidepressants

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A new study by Peter Groot and Jim van Os has found that tapering strips help people successfully discontinue antidepressant medications.

Peter Gordon: Addressing the Divide Between the Arts and Medical Sciences

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An interview with Dr Peter Gordon who describes himself as a gardener with an interest in medicine. He trained in both medicine and architecture before specialising in psychiatry. In addition, he is an activist and campaigner and has a range of creative interests including filmmaking, photography, writing and poetry.

The Interview

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A semistructured diagnostic clinical interview has been developed to identify and differentiate three different types of SSRI and SNRI withdrawal syndromes: new symptoms, rebound,...

Study Examines the Difficulty of Withdrawing from Antidepressant Drugs

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Correcting unnecessary long-term antidepressant use is difficult and met with apprehension by providers and service-users.

How to Avoid Severe SSRI Withdrawal Symptoms?

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After long-term use, most people are going to have serious symptoms when stopping SSRIs. Many people are going to have transient, mild to moderate difficulty and some are going to end up falling down the akathisia rabbit hole. That is a long, difficult drop.

Announcing an International Symposium and Institute on Psychiatric Drug Risks and...

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I have given up on psychiatry as a system capable of “being there” for people who are dealing with life and death issues. Psychiatry as a system of care lacks validity. Every day — unfortunately — we learn of new examples proving this statement. But here's the good news: every day we meet people who show us that the predictions of psychiatry are not true; that there are “cures,” that it is possible to reduce or withdraw psychiatric drugs.

The Psychiatry Sandcastle Continues to Crumble

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Psychiatry would long since have gone the way of phrenology and mesmerism but for the financial support it receives from the pharmaceutical industry. But the truth has a way of trickling out. Here are five recent stories that buck the psychiatry-friendly stance that has characterized the mainstream media for at least the past 50 years.

“The Mystery of When to Stop Antidepressants”

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Researchers are studying whether psychological treatments can prevent relapse after patients go off antidepressant medication, reports the Wall Street Journal, noting that "SSRIs have long been...

What Happened to those Who Were Suicidal in Study 329? And...

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In May 2014, the RIAT team asked GSK what the children who became suicidal in the course of Study 329 have since been told. The consent form says that anyone entering the study would be treated just the way they would be in normal clinical practice. In Study 329, the children taking imipramine were by design force titrated upwards to doses of the order of 300 mg, which is close to double the dose of imipramine given in adult trials by GSK or in normal clinical practice. In normal clinical practice it would be usual to inform somebody who had become suicidal on an SSRI that the treatment had caused their problem.

Ronald Pies Doubles Down (And Why We Should Care)

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This past Saturday, I was on my way back from Europe to Boston, and while on a stop in Iceland, I checked my email and was directed to a new blog by Ronald Pies in Psychiatric Times, in which he once again revisited the question of whether American psychiatry, and the American Psychiatric Association (APA), ever promoted the idea that chemical imbalances caused mental disorders. And just like when I read his 2011 writings on this subject, I found myself wondering what to make of his post. Why was he so intent on maintaining psychiatry’s “innocence?” And why did it matter?