“Insight” into “Mental Illness” Associated with Depression, Poorer Life Satisfaction

Many people being treated for mental illnesses feel slightly more depressed and much less satisfied with their lives if they have greater "insight" into their illnesses, according to a study in Schizophrenia Research. "Insight" was defined by the authors as being related to acknowledgement of one's illness along with "treatment adherence" and "treatment engagement." More →

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“Treatment Resistant” Schizophrenia Strongly Linked to Dopamine Supersensitivity

Over 70% of schizophrenia patients who are "treatment resistant" have apparently developed dopamine supersensitivity psychosis from long-term use of antipsychotic medications, according to a study in Psychiatry Research. More →

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Exercise is an Effective Intervention for Schizophrenia

Separately, two intervention trials and a meta-analysis of the scientific literature found that aerobic exercise significantly helps people struggling with schizophrenia. More →

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Childhood Trauma Connected to Severity of Hallucinations in Ethnic Minorities

The reason that ethnic minorities with psychosis in Norway experience higher levels of severe hallucinations seems to be related to the fact that they also have typically experienced more severe trauma and abuse in their childhoods, according to research in Psychological Medicine. More →

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More Concerns About Links Between Marijuana Use and Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia Bulletin has published three new articles exploring issues related to marijuana use and schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research has also this month published two articles. More →

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Smoking May Thin the Brain Cortex, Increase Dementia, Schizophrenia Risks

Two research reports in Nature have suggested links between smoking and impacts on brain thickness and plasticity, while a commentary in The Lancet Psychiatry discussed what the apparent strong links between smoking and schizophrenia may mean. More →

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“Recovery, Not Progressive Illness, Should Be the Expectation in Schizophrenia”

In World Psychiatry, two Canadian psychiatrists argue that the body of scientific evidence about schizophrenia shows that it is not a progressive illness and therefore we should have much higher expectations of full recoveries than we do. More →

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No Proven Treatments of Any Kind for Psychosis or Schizophrenia in Children or Youth

There are no proven treatments of any kind for children or adolescents experiencing psychosis or schizophrenia, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized comparison trials published in PLOS One. More →

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Do Psychological Therapies for Schizophrenia and Psychosis Work? – A Debate

The journal Progress in Neurology and Psychiatry hosts a debate between Peter Kinderman, one of the co-authors of the British Psychological Society's recent Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia report, and two authors whose meta-analysis of cognitive behavioral therapy was cited in that report. More →

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Heavy Marijuana Use Associated With Three Times Higher Risk of Psychosis

People who smoke high-potency marijuana, especially if they do so daily, are at a three to five times greater risk of experiencing hospitalization for psychosis than people who smoke low-potency marijuana or no marijuana at all, according to research in The Lancet Psychiatry. More →

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Robert Whitaker Missed the Mark on Drugs and Disability: A Call for a Focus on Structural Violence

Robert Whitaker extended one of his core arguments from Anatomy of an Epidemic in a blog post last week. His argument revolves around the claim that psychiatric drugs are the principal cause of increasing psychiatric disability, as measured by U.S. social security disability claims. But does this really explain the rise in recipients of these SSI & SSDI benefits?
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The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia – Version III

The Division of Clinical Psychology of the British Psychological Society published a paper titled Understanding Psychosis and SchizophreniaThe central theme of the paper is that the condition known as psychosis is better understood as a response to adverse life events rather than as a symptom of neurological pathology. The paper was wide-ranging and insightful and, predictably, drew support from most of us on this side of the issue and criticism from psychiatry.  Section 12 of the paper is headed “Medication” and under the subheading “Key Points” you’ll find this quote: “[Antipsychotic] drugs appear to have a general rather than a specific effect: there is little evidence that they are correcting an underlying biochemical abnormality.”
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How Can Two Such Radically Different Experiences Both Be Called “Schizophrenia”?

In The Lancet Psychiatry, psychiatrist Jose Andres Saez Fonseca disposes with the language of "the diagnostic manuals," and intimately describes two troubled people he once knew, and the very different inner worlds each of them lived within. He then laments that "schizophrenia" seems to be a poor and misleading label for either of these people's experiences, let alone for both of them. More →

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Different Antipsychotics Have Different Effects on Brain Volume

First generation antipsychotics seem to cause general brain volume loss, while second generation antipsychotics seem to both increase and decrease the thickness of different parts of the brain, according to a study led by University of Melbourne researchers published in Psychological Medicine. And the effects on the brain, they found, are noticeable within a matter of months of beginning to take the medications. More →

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How Come the Word “Antipsychiatry” is so Challenging?

So here we go again; another meeting with another young person who describes how he is in an acute crisis – you may call it – and is diagnosed and prescribed neuroleptics. He is told by the doctor that he suffers from a life-long illness and he will from now on be dependent on his “medication.” As long as people are met this way I see no alternative than showing that there are alternatives. If that means being “antipsychiatry,” then I am more than happy to define myself and our work in that way.
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Quotations From the Genetics “Graveyard”: Nearly Half a Century of False Positive Gene Discovery Claims in Psychiatry

In a 1992 essay, British psychiatric genetic researcher Michael Owen wondered whether schizophrenia molecular genetic research would become the “graveyard of molecular geneticists.”1 Owen predicted that if major schizophrenia genes existed, they would be found within five years of that date. He was optimistic, believing that “talk of graveyards is premature.”2 Owen now believes that genes for schizophrenia and other disorders have been found, and was subsequently knighted for his work. Despite massively improved technology, however, decades of molecular genetic gene finding attempts have failed to provide consistently replicated evidence of specific genes that play a role in causing the major psychiatric disorders.
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My Mysterious Son

In the autumn of 1996, my son was seventeen when he told me one day on the way home from school: “I don’t know what’s happening, I can’t find my old self again.” He’d had a seemingly marvelous summer staying with family in Mexico, fishing and learning to surf. He’d achieved nearly a full scholarship for his junior year at a Boston private school. However, one teacher had observed that, in class, he “sometimes seems to be out of touch and unable to focus his mind.”
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“Auditory Hallucinations: Debunking the Myth of Language Supremacy”

In Schizophrenia Bulletin, an Australian and a French researcher argue that the Hearing Voices Movement and similar groups are often misleading the public and researchers with their focus on voice hallucinations to the exclusion of the broader category of "auditory hallucinations" -- the latter of which can often be simply noises. "Voices are a preferred term [by the Hearing Voices Movement], as it makes a connection to a meaningful human experience rather than 'an arbitrary content induced by disease,'" states the article. More →

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Psychiatrists’ Prescriptions for First-time Psychosis Often Don’t Follow Guidelines

"Many patients with first-episode psychosis receive medications that do not comply with recommended guidelines for first-episode treatment," states a National Institute of Mental Health press release about a new NIMH study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. The study found that about 40% of patients who'd been diagnosed with having psychotic experiences for the first time in their lives were being too heavily medicated right away. More →

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How are Professional Artists Similar and Different from People Diagnosed with Schizophrenia?

People "who are prone to psychosis" in its most "extreme" forms, such as delusions, hallucinations, and disorganized thought, have been found to also show especially elevated levels of creativity, writes a team of Austrian researchers in Frontiers in Psychology. However, in a review of the literature on this topic, they conclude that there is at least one key difference between those people who tend to only struggle with their psychotic experiences and those who manage to succeed in the arts. More →

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Art Therapy Shows Promise for Helping Live with Schizophrenia

Psychodynamic art therapy shows promise in helping in-patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, according to a study by German psychiatric researchers in PLOS One. More →

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Neuroscientists Recreate Ghostly Presences in Laboratory

Neuroscientists have been able to consistently recreate in people the feeling of another person or ghostly entity hovering nearby, according to a study reported in Mediacom. After examining people with epilepsy who frequently have the experience, the researchers theorized there was a type of brain-perception "dissonance" at work. More →

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Why Do Congenitally Blind People Never Get Diagnosed with Schizophrenia?

"A long-standing enigma in psychiatry has been why no-one has been able to find someone who has both congenital blindness and a diagnosis of schizophrenia," writes Mind Hacks. And a new study into the phenomenon published in Frontiers of Human Neuroscience "raises more questions than it answers." More →

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Environment Predicts Schizophrenia Risk Better than Genes

We should focus more on reducing or preventing specific environmental and lifestyle risk factors for schizophrenia, because genetic risk factors have no predictive capability whatsoever, according to a study in The Lancet Psychiatry. More →

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“Preventing the Onset of Psychosis: Not Quite There Yet”

Robert Heinssen and Thomas Insel of the National Institute of Mental Health argue in Schizophrenia Bulletin that the balance of evidence does not support early intervention in psychosis. More →

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