Saturday, December 14, 2019

Why is the Field of Psychotherapy Still Fractured into Different Approaches?

Psychotherapy is dominated by contradicting schools of thought, exhibits a gap between research and practice, and repackages old ideas rather than finding clinical consensus.

Pervasive Industry Influence in Healthcare Sector Harms Patients

Experts across the globe point to the harms of drug companies’ influence on research, practice, and education in healthcare noting that it compromises patient care.

Researchers Critique WHO Mental Health Technology

Researchers critically examine the underlying assumptions and implications of a new WHO mental health technology designed to streamline psychiatric assessment internationally.

Young Adult Food Insecurity Linked to Poor Mental Health

A new study identifies significant links between food insecurity and sleep, anxiety, depression, and compromised wellbeing among young people in the United States

Statisticians: Current Policies Approve Ineffective Treatments

Current standards for clinical trials rely on statistical methods that allow for ineffective treatments to gain approval.

Researchers Address Dangers of Polypharmacy and Inappropriate Medication Use

A new special issue brings together articles exploring the harmful effects of simultaneous multiple medication use.

Measuring How Mental Health Professionals See Service Users’ Rights

A new scale has been developed and validated to examine beliefs held by mental health professionals towards service users’ rights.

Experts Raise Ethical Concerns About Machine Learning in Medicine

The use of machine learning algorithms (known as artificial intelligence) in the medical field raises a slew of ethical concerns.

How Antidepressants Shape Young Women’s Sense of Self

Young women’s narratives indicate ways antidepressants have shaped their sense of self.

D-Cycloserine Supplement Does Not Add Much to Exposure Therapy

A closer look at a new study reporting that the supplement D-cycloserine improved anxiety when used with exposure therapy.

Involuntary Hospitalization More Likely With Psychosis Diagnoses and Few Resources

New study links involuntary hospitalization with psychotic diagnosis, previous involuntary hospitalization, and economic deprivation.

Rates of Opioid Use Remain High Among US Adolescents

Researchers investigate trends in opioid use, prescriptions, misuse, and access reported by adolescents and young adults.

How Race and Class Impact Schizophrenia and Substance-Use Diagnoses

A new article explores how psychiatric diagnoses are differentially applied to people of different racial and class backgrounds.

Dissecting the DSM Debate: Researchers Analyze Critiques Across Audiences

A new study systematically explores critical reactions to the DSM-5 and identifies unifying themes.

Despite Claims, EPA Supplement Does Not Improve ADHD Symptoms in Youth

A new study reports that the supplement EPA improved ADHD symptoms but a closer look calls these results into question.

Parachute NYC Peer Support Program Presents Challenges and Opportunities

Anthropologists study Parachute NYC to identify challenges and opportunities for implementing peer support and Open Dialogue practices.

New CDC Data Underscores Need to Address Adverse Childhood Experiences

New prevention strategies are needed based on our increasing understanding of the impacts of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).

No Matter Which Measure You Use, Antidepressants Aren’t That Effective

Researchers compared the efficacy of antidepressants using different rating scales and found them to be no different—just slightly better than placebo, and not meeting the criteria for clinical significance.

Psychotherapy Less Effective for People in Poverty and Those on Antidepressants

A new study finds poorer depression and anxiety outcomes in psychotherapy for people in economically deprived neighborhoods and those on antidepressants.

Increased Antidepressant Use Does Not Decrease Depression Prevalence in Older Adults

The use of antidepressants has risen quickly among older adults but the rate of depressive symptoms in this population has not declined as a result.

Dehumanization Linked to Poorer Mental and Physical Health

A new review finds that dehumanizing language, including self-dehumanization, is connected to anxiety, depression, and disordered eating.

Parent Marijuana Use Associated With Substance Use in Children

A new study examines longitudinal, intergenerational patterns associated with marijuana use.

Fear and Belief in “Chemical Imbalance” Prevent People from Coming Off Antidepressants

Researchers interviewed people who were given medical advice to discontinue antidepressants.

Refugees and Immigrants Experience Increased Medical Coercion

Refugees and first-generation immigrants of African descent are at greater risk of experiencing medical coercion when compared to immigrants of other visible minority communities in Canada.

Training Health Workers in Therapy Leads to Improvements and Less Medication Use

A Nigerian study finds that more than three-quarters of patients improved, even when only 13% were prescribed medication.

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