Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Psychiatry Defends Its Antipsychotics: A Case Study of Institutional Corruption

Jeffrey LIeberman and colleagues have published a paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry stating that there is no evidence that psychiatric drugs cause long-term harm, and that the evidence shows that these drugs provide a great benefit to patients. A close examination of their review reveals that it is a classic example of institutional corruption, which was meant to protect guild interests.

The Case Against Antipsychotics

This review of the scientific literature, stretching across six decades, makes the case that antipsychotics, over the long-term, do more harm than good. The drugs lower recovery rates and worsen functional outcomes over longer periods of time.

Study Finds Improved Functioning for ‘Schizophrenia’ Without Antipsychotics

Long-term treatment with antipsychotic drugs is currently considered the standard treatment for patients diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia.’ A new study challenges this practice, however. The...

Anticholinergic Psychiatric Drugs Linked to a 50% Increase in Dementia

People who take anticholinergic drugs, such as antidepressants and antipsychotics, are at a 50% higher risk of dementia.

Withdrawal from Antipsychotics

A review of the scientific literature related to the withdrawal of antipsychotics: animal studies, withdrawal symptoms, tapering success rates, and consumer accounts of discontinuation.

Study Suggests Long-Term Antipsychotic Use May Result in Poorer Cognitive Functioning

Association found between long-term antipsychotic use and poorer performance on cognitive tasks in adults diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia.’

Service-Users See Long-Term Antipsychotic Use as Compromising Recovery, Review Finds

A new meta-review examines the experiences of antipsychotic drugs use among people diagnosed with a psychotic disorder.

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Linked to Polypharmacy, Benzos, and Race

Research from London and Taipei finds that neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is associated with the number of different antipsychotics used (polypharmacy), rather than the overall...

New Research Suggests Brain Abnormalities in ‘Schizophrenia’ May Result From Antipsychotics

Study finds that reduced cortical thickness and brain surface area associated with 'schizophrenia' may result from antipsychotic drug use.

Danish Study Finds Better 10-year Outcomes in Patients Off Antipsychotics

Study finds that 74% of patients with a psychotic disorder off antipsychotics at end of 10 years are in remission.

Review Finds FDA Approval of Digital Antipsychotic Misguided

The approval of the digital antipsychotic may open the door for more pharmaceutical company profits without evidence of benefits to patients.

Antipsychotics for Childhood “Behavioral Problems” Skyrocket

Researchers from Columbia University and other New York institutions found a dramatically increasing use of antipsychotics to treat ADHD and other behavioral problems in...

Reduction/Discontinuation of Antipsychotics Produces Higher Long-Term Recovery

A study published today in the American Medical Association's journal JAMA Psychiatry reports that patients whose antipsychotic treatment was reduced or discontinued (DR) experienced a recovery...

New Review of Antipsychotics for Schizophrenia Questions Evidence for Long Term Use

A systematic review of the limited research available on the long-term effects of antipsychotics finds fewer symptoms in those off of the drugs.

A Tale of Two Studies

With increasing evidence that psychiatric drugs do more harm than good over the long term, the field of psychiatry often seems focused on sifting through the mounds of research data it has collected, eager to at last sit up and cry, here’s a shiny speck of gold! Our drugs do work! One recently published study on withdrawal of antipsychotics tells of long-term benefits. A second tells of long-term harm. Which one is convincing?

Two-Thirds of Schizophrenia Patients Do Not Remit on Antipsychotics

A new analysis of antipsychotic treatment of schizophrenia (published in Schizophrenia Bulletin) has found that two-thirds of patients treated this way do not experience symptom remission.

Scientists Clarify Risks of Augmenting with Antipsychotic Medications for Depression

The researchers found that while antipsychotic drugs may be slightly more effective than alternative antidepressants, they come with a much higher side effect burden.
Yellow sign reading "Cognitive Hazard"

Discontinuation of Antipsychotics Improves Cognitive Functioning

A study, recently published in Psychological Medicine, examined the cognitive functioning of individuals with schizophrenia who discontinued antipsychotics, and those who maintained their antipsychotic...

Review Questions Long Term Use of Antipsychotics

Patients who recover from a single episode of psychosis are often prescribed antipsychotics long-term, despite a lack of evidence for this practice

How Exercise Can Help With First Episode Psychosis

New study examines the experiences of people utilizing an exercise program following a first-episode psychosis.

Antipsychotic Medications Are Causing Obsessive Compulsive Disorders

Common second-generation antipsychotic medications are causing symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder to emerge in many people who previously only had schizophrenia symptoms, according to a...

Second-Generation Antipsychotics Just as Likely as Older Drugs to Cause EPS

In a study of an earlier randomized controlled trial of antipsychotics, researchers from Yale and the U.K found that second-generation antipsychotics were as likely...

Inappropriate Use of Antipsychotics on Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

One-third of adults with an intellectual or developmental disability are dispensed antipsychotics, despite having no existing psychiatric diagnosis.

Better Outcomes Off Medication for Those Recovered from First-Episode Schizophrenia

A new study has found that of 10 people who were fully recovered from their first episode of schizophrenia (FES), those not taking antipsychotics did better in terms of cognitive, social, and role functioning—and reached full recovery more quickly.

Antipsychotic-induced Sexual Dysfunction Underreported

Researchers found some antipsychotics to be worse than others for causing sexual dysfunction.

Follow Us

19,639FansLike
11,994FollowersFollow
3,540SubscribersSubscribe