Tuesday, April 7, 2020

The Case Against Antipsychotics

This review of the scientific literature, stretching across six decades, makes the case that antipsychotics, over the long-term, do more harm than good. The drugs lower recovery rates and worsen functional outcomes over longer periods of time.

Psychiatry Defends Its Antipsychotics: A Case Study of Institutional Corruption

Jeffrey LIeberman and colleagues have published a paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry stating that there is no evidence that psychiatric drugs cause long-term harm, and that the evidence shows that these drugs provide a great benefit to patients. A close examination of their review reveals that it is a classic example of institutional corruption, which was meant to protect guild interests.

Does Longer Duration of Untreated Psychosis Cause Worse Outcomes?

New research counters the long-held assumption that a longer duration of untreated psychosis is associated with worse outcomes.

Largest Survey of Antipsychotic Experiences Reveals Negative Results

A new survey exploring antipsychotic user experience finds that more than half of the participants report only negative experiences.

Review Explores First-Person Experiences of People Taking Antipsychotics

A new systematic review finds that patients report reduced symptoms but also loss of self and agency while taking antipsychotics.

Study Finds Improved Functioning for ‘Schizophrenia’ Without Antipsychotics

Long-term treatment with antipsychotic drugs is currently considered the standard treatment for patients diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia.’ A new study challenges this practice, however. The...

New Research Suggests Brain Abnormalities in ‘Schizophrenia’ May Result From Antipsychotics

Study finds that reduced cortical thickness and brain surface area associated with 'schizophrenia' may result from antipsychotic drug use.

Better Outcomes Off Medication for Those Recovered from First-Episode Schizophrenia

A new study has found that of 10 people who were fully recovered from their first episode of schizophrenia (FES), those not taking antipsychotics did better in terms of cognitive, social, and role functioning—and reached full recovery more quickly.

Anticholinergic Psychiatric Drugs Linked to a 50% Increase in Dementia

People who take anticholinergic drugs, such as antidepressants and antipsychotics, are at a 50% higher risk of dementia.
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Discontinuation of Antipsychotics Improves Cognitive Functioning

A study, recently published in Psychological Medicine, examined the cognitive functioning of individuals with schizophrenia who discontinued antipsychotics, and those who maintained their antipsychotic...

Antipsychotics Associated with High Risk of Death in Children

A new study has found that children and adolescents taking a high dose of antipsychotics are almost twice as likely to die of any cause than children on other types of medications.

Claims That Long-term Antipsychotic Use Leads to Better Outcomes are Misleading, Researchers Argue

Researchers reveal the limitations and misleading interpretations of two recent studies that claim to demonstrate that long-term antipsychotic use leads to better outcomes.

Scientists Clarify Risks of Augmenting with Antipsychotic Medications for Depression

The researchers found that while antipsychotic drugs may be slightly more effective than alternative antidepressants, they come with a much higher side effect burden.

Service-Users See Long-Term Antipsychotic Use as Compromising Recovery, Review Finds

A new meta-review examines the experiences of antipsychotic drugs use among people diagnosed with a psychotic disorder.

Psychotropics Linked to Worse Physical Problems and Mortality in Psychiatric Patients

Common psychotropic medications may be contributing to the higher rates of physical illnesses and mortality in people diagnosed with mental illnesses.

Reducing Antipsychotic Use May Improve Health for People with Mental Health Diagnoses

A new study offers radical solutions for improving the cardiovascular health of people with mental health diagnoses: reducing antipsychotic prescriptions..

A Tale of Two Studies

With increasing evidence that psychiatric drugs do more harm than good over the long term, the field of psychiatry often seems focused on sifting through the mounds of research data it has collected, eager to at last sit up and cry, here’s a shiny speck of gold! Our drugs do work! One recently published study on withdrawal of antipsychotics tells of long-term benefits. A second tells of long-term harm. Which one is convincing?

Medications May Add to Mortality Rate in Schizophrenia

Dutch researchers write in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology that, in a prospective study of 7415 persons with diagnoses of schizophrenia, use of a first-generation...

Withdrawal from Antipsychotics

A review of the scientific literature related to the withdrawal of antipsychotics: animal studies, withdrawal symptoms, tapering success rates, and consumer accounts of discontinuation.

Danish Study Finds Better 10-year Outcomes in Patients Off Antipsychotics

Study finds that 74% of patients with a psychotic disorder off antipsychotics at end of 10 years are in remission.

Researchers Warn of “Brain Atrophy” in Children Prescribed Antipsychotics

Researchers discuss the evidence that antipsychotic medications may cause brain atrophy in children, whose brains are still developing.

Infants Exposed to Psychotropic Drugs During Pregnancy At Risk

New research published in the July issue of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry found that the use of mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, antidepressants, and hypnotics during pregnancy is associated with increased health risks to the infant.

Drug Treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder Not Supported By Evidence

New research published in the August issue of Psychiatric Annals evaluates the results of randomized control trials on the use of various psychotropic drugs for patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Despite the “American Psychiatric Association’s practice guidelines endorsement of SSRIs as first-line therapies for BPD,” the results of the meta-analysis reveal that pharmacotherapy in BPD is “not supported by the current literature,” and “should be avoided whenever possible.”

Two-Thirds of Schizophrenia Patients Do Not Remit on Antipsychotics

A new analysis of antipsychotic treatment of schizophrenia (published in Schizophrenia Bulletin) has found that two-thirds of patients treated this way do not experience symptom remission.

Anticholinergic Medications Linked to Dementia Similar to Early Alzheimer’s

A new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, investigates the effects of anticholinergic medications, such as antidepressants and antipsychotics, on cognition in older adults diagnosed with schizophrenia.

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