Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Study Highlights Importance of Social Interactions in Psychosis Recovery

Study finds frequency of social interactions predicts long-term remission in first-episode psychosis.

Racism Linked to Poor Health Outcomes in Children

New study finds children who have been exposed to discrimination show higher likelihood of anxiety, depression, and ADHD.

Food Insecurity Linked to Mental Health Globally

Global analysis of 149 countries finds food insecurity is associated with poorer mental health.

Childhood Adversity May Increase Risk of Suicide

Swedish study suggests experiencing adversity in childhood is linked to dying by suicide as an adolescent or young adult.

Training Nursing Home Staff in Understanding Needs Can Reduce Antipsychotic Use

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, the largest study of its kind, has shown it is possible to reduce the use of antipsychotics in nursing homes, by engaging their staff in a training program designed to target residents’ strengths and their unmet needs.

New Findings Suggest Masculinity is a Risk Factor for Suicidal Thinking

Men who report being self-reliant may be at greater risk of suicidal thinking.

Reducing Overuse of Low-Value Treatments

Researchers provide an action-planning framework to engage providers in the reduction of low-value healthcare.

Physical Activity Predicts Fewer Symptoms of Depression in Children

An article published in Pediatrics is the first to examine the relationship between physical activity and depression in middle childhood (years 6 to 10) longitudinally.

Danish Study Finds Better 10-year Outcomes in Patients Off Antipsychotics

Study finds that 74% of patients with a psychotic disorder off antipsychotics at end of 10 years are in remission.

An Alternative Perspective on Psychotherapy: It is Not a ‘Cure’

Kev Harding argues against conceptualizations of therapy as a ‘cure’ to an ‘illness’ and instead offers alternative approaches.

Collaborative Care Effective for Older Adults with Depressive Symptoms

A new study suggests that depressive symptoms in older adults can be improved with non-invasive behavioral activation techniques. These approaches appear to have a preventative effect, serving to prevent further depressive symptoms from developing.

Despite Increase in Treatments, Prevalence of Mental Health Issues Climbs

Findings show that despite increases in treatment availability, the prevalence of mental health issues has not decreased.

Transition into Poverty May Worsen Child and Maternal Mental Health

Transitioning into poverty linked to behavioral issues in children, but may be mitigated by mother’s mental health.

New Medications Fail to Show Efficacy for Alzheimer’s Disease

Three phase III clinical trials assessing the efficacy of Lundbeck’s investigational drug idalopirdine for Alzheimer’s disease have failed

Many Patient Advocacy Organizations Are Funded By Industry

New research investigates the financial conflicts of interest (FCOI) of patient advocacy organizations (PAOs) in the United States.

BPS Releases Review of Alternatives to Antipsychotics

BPS releases report encouraging behavioral interventions for people with dementia, rather than antipsychotics

Pets Play Central Role in Management of Mental Health Problems

Individuals with long-term mental health conditions identify pets as valuable supports in their daily lives.

Post-Election Considerations for Users and Survivors of Psychiatry

A variety of scenarios of social and economic collapse have gone through many of our minds since Election Day. Insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies want to keep people on drugs, but what if there was no government subsidy for those who can’t pay?

Study Finds Sexist Attitudes Linked to Poor Mental Health in Men

Adherence to stereotypically sexist masculine beliefs such as self-reliance, power over women, and playboy behavior were linked to poor mental health outcomes

The Effects of Practicing Psychotherapy on Therapists’ Personal Lives

A new study, published in Psychotherapy Research, explores how having a career in psychotherapy affects therapists’ personal lives.

The ACE Survey is Unusable Data

Do the effects of trauma matter more, or a person's ACE score? I think this is unusable data that harms people when you gather it. Here's why.

Study Finds Music Therapy May Be Effective in Clinical Practice

In a new study published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Professor Sam Porter and co-authors, present the results of a music...

Researchers Find Link Between Economic Hardship and Cognitive Function

The results of the prospective cohort study that analyzed data from almost 3,400 individuals show that individuals who experience long-term poverty perform worse on cognitive tasks than their peers who have never experienced poverty.

Why Social Isolation Leads to Inflammation

We are wired for community. If we disconnect, our bodies will call us back to the sense of human connection that we are wired for, using the unexpected language of inflammation.

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